CONFERENCE ON RETROVIRUSES
AND OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS

Boston, Massachusetts
March 8–11, 2020

 

Conference Dates and Location: 
February 13–16, 2017 | Seattle, Washington
Abstract Number: 
872

CHANGING PATTERN OF CRYSTAL METH USE IN BLACK & WHITE MSM, WASHINGTON, DC, 2008–2014

Author(s): 

Irene Kuo1, Rudy Patrick1, Jenevieve Opoku2, Anthony Rawls1, Manya Magnus1, James Peterson1, Michael Kharfen2, Alan Greenberg1

1The George Washington Univ, Washington, DC,2District of Columbia Dept of Hlth, Washington, DC

Abstract Body: 

Crystal meth use is associated with increased sexual risk behavior, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite evidence of declining methamphetamine use among MSM, it is unknown whether this is occurring across different racial groups. We explored trends in crystal meth use between black MSM (BMSM) and white MSM (WMSM) in Washington, DC over time.

Data from National HIV Behavioral Surveillance in 2008, 2011, and 2014 were used. MSM recruited via venue-based sampling completed an interviewer-administered survey regarding past year drug use and sexual behaviors and tested for HIV. The prevalence of self-reported past year crystal meth use was calculated for each data collection year by race; a chi-square test for trend assessed changes in prevalence over time. Multivariable logistic regression were stratified by race and identified independent correlates of crystal meth use, including year of data collection as a covariate.

Overall, 521 BMSM and 668 WMSM were analyzed. The age distribution and HIV prevalence was constant for WMSM across time, but BMSM were older in 2011 and had a higher HIV prevalence in 2014 versus other years. In 2008, 2011, and 2014, the prevalence of crystal meth use among BMSM was 4.4%, 6.0% and 9.9% (p=0.04) and 9.5%, 5.1%, and 4.7% respectively among WMSM (p=0.04). Among BMSM, independent correlates of crystal meth use were having ≥4 sex partners vs 1-3 (AOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 5.8) and being HIV positive (AOR: 4.2; 95% CI:1.8, 9.7); there was an elevated odds of crystal meth use in 2014 versus 2008 (AOR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 6.5). Among WMSM, being older (AOR:2.5; 95%CI: 1.0,5.9), earning <$20K per year vs >$50K (AOR: 8.5; 95% CI: 3.1, 23.0), having ≥4 sex partners (AOR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.3, 7.9), and being HIV positive (AOR: 10.6; 95% CI: 4.4, 25.3) were associated; there was reduced odds of crystal meth use over time for WMSM (2011: AOR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 0.9 and 2014: AOR: 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1, 0.7 vs 2008). Condomless anal sex was not associated with crystal meth use for either racial group.

We observed an increase in crystal meth use among venue-attending BMSM and a decrease among WMSM between 2008-2014. There is a need to better understand the changing pattern of use that might impact HIV risk, particularly for BMSM. Across both races, recent crystal meth use was associated with more sex partners and HIV-positivity, highlighting the continued need for interventions among crystal meth users to reduce HIV transmission risks.

Session Number: 
TD-14
Session Title: 
HIV AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE: DOUBLE TROUBLE
Presenting Author: 
Irene Kuo
Presenter Institution: 
George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health